PEMF and Tennis Elbow – Lateral Epicondylitis

PEMF and Tennis Elbow – Lateral Epicondylitis(extract from our NTA members only material)

Abstracts of scientific studies on the use of PEMF with Tennis Elbow:

Effectiveness of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMF) in lateral epicondylitis 
(Date: 2007)

We aimed to investigate the efficacy of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) in lateral epicondylitis comparing the modality with sham PEMF and local steroid injection. Sixty patients with lateral epicondylitis were randomly and equally distributed into three groups as follows: Group I received PEMF, Group II sham PEMF, and Group III a corticosteroid + anesthetic agent injection. Pain levels during rest, activity, nighttime, resisted wrist dorsiflexion, and forearm supination were investigated with visual analog scale (VAS). Pain threshold on elbow was determined with algometer. All patients were evaluated before treatment at the third week and the third month. VAS values during activity and pain levels during resisted wrist dorsiflexion were significantly lower in Group III than Group I at the third week. Group I patients had lower pain during rest, activity and nighttime than Group III at third month. PEMF seems to reduce lateral epicondylitis pain better than sham PEMF. Corticosteroid and anesthetic agent injections can be used in patients for rapid return to activities.

  • Author: Uzunca, K. and Birtane, M. and Tastekin, N.
  • Year: 2007
  • Link:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=16633709
  • Comment:Uzunca, Kaan Birtane, Murat Tastekin, Nurettin Comparative Study Randomized Controlled Trial Belgium Clinical rheumatology Clin Rheumatol. 2007 Jan;26(1):69-74. Epub 2006 Apr 22.
  • Address: Trakya University Medical Faculty Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department, Edirne, Turkey. druzunca@yahoo.com
  • Booktitle: Clin Rheumatol

Rehabilitation for patients with lateral epicondylitis: a systematic review 
(Date: 2004)

The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of conservative treatments for lateral epicondylitis and to provide recommendations based on this evidence. Five reviewers searched computerized bibliographic databases for articles on the conservative treatment of lateral epicondylitis from the years 1983 to 2003. A total of 209 studies were located; however, only 31 of these met the study inclusion criteria. Each of the articles was randomly allocated to reviewers and critically appraised using a structured critical appraisal tool with 23 items. Treatment recommendations were based on this rating and Sackett’s Level of Evidence. This review has determined, with at least level 2b evidence, that a number of treatments, including acupuncture, exercise therapy, manipulations and mobilizations, ultrasound, phonophoresis, Rebox, and ionization with diclofenac all show positive effects in the reduction of pain or improvement in function for patients with lateral epicondylitis. There is also at least level 2b evidence showing laser therapy and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy to be ineffective in the management of this condition. Practitioners should use the treatment techniques that have strongest evidence and ensure that studies findings are generalized to patients who are similar to those reported in primary research studies in terms of patient demographics and injury presentation.

  • Author: Trudel, D. and Duley, J. and Zastrow, I. and Kerr, E. W. and Davidson, R. and MacDermid, J. C.
  • Year: 2004
  • Link:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=15162109
  • Comment:Trudel, Daniel Duley, Jennifer Zastrow, Ingrid Kerr, Erin W Davidson, Robyn MacDermid, Joy C Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov’t Review United States Journal of hand therapy : official journal of the American Society of Hand Therapists J Hand Ther. 2004 Apr-Jun;17(2):243-66.
  • Address: Canadian Forces Base Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
  • Booktitle: J Hand Ther

Chronic lateral humeral epicondylitis–a double-blind controlled assessment of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy 
Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) have been shown to be beneficial in the treatment of rotator cuff tendinitis. As lateral humeral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) is a similar chronic tendon lesion, 30 patients with both clinical and thermographic evidence of tennis elbow were randomly allocated to receive either active or inactive PEMF therapy. Treatment was continued for a minimum period of eight weeks. At this time there was no statistical difference between the two groups.

  • Devereaux, M. D. and Hazleman, B. L. and Thomas, P. P.
  • 1985
  • 3
  • 333-6–
  • Adult Double-Blind Method Electromagnetic Fields/*therapeutic use Electromagnetics/*therapeutic use Female Humans
  • http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=4085165
  • Devereaux, M D Hazleman, B L Thomas, P P Clinical Trial Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Clin Exp Rheumatol

PEMF and Nutritional Therapy for Arthritis

Exclusive material for Nutritional Therapeutics Association members. N.T.A. practitioners always advise our patients on a case per case basis on adequate nutritional support (ie hydration, diet or supplementation) throughout the process. Some supplements can greatly increase PEMF treatments and are included in the textbooks and training of our members.  While PEMF can always be used apart of any other program, it is considered support medicine to existing programs the patient is involved in. The N.T.A. has specialists in the areas of meridian and accupressure therapies, psychological therapy, nutritional, sports medicine, and live blood analysis.  Each of these areas have been consulted in our overall approach in our wellness programs for alternative therapy with arthritis. We look at things with the overal body wellness approach first, so that the local approach may be more successful. PEMF devices are available on the market for home use, for example one of the most advanced and developed versions from Swiss Bionic Solutions. Contact directly N.T.A. Consultant Stephen M. Knott for more information at +31 187844881. There are many home use strategies and solutions. Practitioners can send their clients to order these home use PEMF devices directly at Swiss Bionics at http://imrs-pemf.com. These are EU and FDA regulated devices for home use in overall wellness and support medicine programs.

Practitioners and consultants can get a good commission if they want to open their own Intelligent Wellness Business, and register as a Certified Lifestyle Consultant. We can credential you from NTA (or Swiss Bionics can). Then you can always send your clients directly to order from Swiss Bionics, their home based unit. The iMRS is relatively inexpensive, and has the most developed version of PEMF on the market, now superceded by the Omnium1 (also available from Swiss Bionics). Swiss Bionics also makes available a free 1 month rental. NTA has offices worldwide and may be able to let you try them try various PEMF devices if they are not sure about using it. In either case you will need a support representative. Yours will be Stephen Knott, Alternative Therapist in the Netherlands, who can help get you started.

Wellness Consultant Stephen M. Knott combines his 10 years research, study and practice in these fields to provide thorough solutions in alternative therapy. He has found a vast wealth of benefit in using PEMF in alternative therapy programs, and recommends it above all other meridian and energy medicine based approaches.

Here is a show done by Dr. Oz (also featured by Oprah) for NTA members to have ideas how it works reaching our patients who have arthritic pain. Dr. Oz recommends that every home has a unit.  more from doctoroz.com

Material:

1.1 ARTHRITIS (Inflammation of Joints)

Arthritis is characterized by redness of the joints combined with intense pain and swelling. The causes of most forms of arthritis are still unknown. The most common type is acute rheumatoid arthritis. This disease affects three times as many women as men and usually begins between the ages of 20 and 30. This reactive arthritis is not caused directly by pathogens such as bacteria or viruses, but instead it is the result of an inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract or the urinary tract which may have been several weeks in the past. The joint symptoms are often preceded by an inflammation of the onsils (rheumatic fever) caused by streptocci (pyogenic pathogens, i.e., germs that produce pus). Due to the use of antibiotics, this disease rarely occurs today. Usually larger joints are affected by acute rheumatoid arthritis, especially the ankle and knee joints. Only in rare cases does the acute inflammation affect the bones or cartilage permanently. The intense pain cna move from one joint to another, but usually disappears spontaneously without any additional medication.

1.2 Primary chronic polyarthritis (PCP)

Chronic polyarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis affects especially young women between the ages of 20 and 30 or around the age of 40. The cause of this autoimmune disease has not yet been determined conclusively. It is assumed that the immune system is misled by a virus to incorrectly recognize the body’s own cells in the joint as foreign substances, so it begins to attack these cells and destroy them. In 80% of those affected, the protein is found in the blood, which is an indication for the so-called rheumatoid factor. It is characterized by symmetrical involvement of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the finger. The shoulder joints and knee joints may be involved in the attacks, with the hip joints being invovled less frequently. The inflammation affects the tender skin of the inside surfaces of the joints (synovia). If these joint surfaces begin to stick together, the inflammation attacks the cartilage, ultimately destroying it. The metacarpophalangeal joints then often become grotesquely deformed. The typical stiffness of joints in the morning can subside again in the course of the day due to movement, but if left untreated, it may end in ankylosis (immobility). The goal of therapeutic treatment is to relieve pain and stop the progression of the disease to maintain mobility of the joints for as long as possible.

Effect of PEMF on arthritis: relieving pain, supporting therapy, reducing the extent of the disease

Proper use of system for arthritis: (Use built in programs, i-guide or texbooks).

SOME ARTHRITIS TREATMENT CASE STUDIES WITH PEMF (more in the textbooks.)

The Nutritional Therapeutics Association network has compiled the following case studies that have demonstrated benefits when using PEMF in recovery programs together with Arthritis. Our associate practitioners always advise the patients to include a good intake of water and nutrition throughout the process.

1. A study of the effects of Pulsed Electro-Magnetic Field Therapy with respect to serological grouping in rheumatoid arthritis. Ganguly KS, Sarkar AK, Datta AK, Rakshit A. National Institute for the Orthopaedically Handicapped (NIOH), Calcutta.

2. A case of congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia treated with Pulsing Electro-Magnetic Fields. 17-year follow-up. Ito H, Shirai Y, Gembun Y. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan.

3. A double-blind trial of the clinical effects of electro-magnetic fields in osteoarthritis. Trock DH, Bollet AJ, Dyer RH Jr, Fielding LP, Miner WK, Markoll R. Department of Medicine (Rheumatology), Danbury Hospital, CT 06810 USA.

4. The effect of Pulsed Electro-Magnetic Fields in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee and cervical spine. Report of randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trials. Trock DH, Bollet AJ, Markoll R. Department of Medicine, Danbury Hospital. CT USA.

5. Magnetic pulse treatment for knee osteoarthritis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Pipitone N, Scott DL. Rheumatology Department, King’s College Hospital (Dulwich, England).

6. Electro-Magnetic fields for the treatment of osteoarthritis. Hulme J, Robinson V, DeBie R, Wells G, Judd M, Tugwell P. Cochrane Collaborating Center, Center for Global Health, Institute of Population Health – University of Ottawa, 1 Stewart Street, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1N 6N5.

7. Modification of osteoarthritis by Pulsed Electro-Magnetic Field-a morphological study. Ciombor DM, Aaron RK, Wang S, Simon B.; Department of Orthopaedics, Brown Medical School, Providence USA.

8. Pulsed magnetic field therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee-a double-blind sham-controlled trial. Nicolakis P, Kollmitzer J, Crevenna R, Bittner C, Erdogmus CB, Nicolakis J. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, AKH Wien, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

9. Therapeutic effects of pulsed magnetic fields on joint diseases Riva Sanseverino E, Vannini A, Castellacci P., Università di Bologna, Italy

10. Terapia a segnali pulsati nella patologia degenerativa artrosica: nostra esperienza. D.Rizzitano, A. Gatti et al. Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”. Cattedra di specializzazione in Anestesia e rianimazione.

11. Low-amplitude, extremely low frequency magnetic fields for the treatment of osteoarthritic knees: a double- blind clinical study. Jacobson JI, Gorman R, Yamanashi WS, Saxena BB, Clayton L. Altern Ther Health Med. 2001 Sep-Oct;7(5):54-64, 66-9.

Read More about how PEMF is viable as an alternative therapy for arthritic conditions

Full papers:

PEMF_Osteoarthritis

PEMF_Osteoarthritis_1

PEMF_Osteoarthritis_2

PEMF_Osteoarthritis_3

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